Unemployment Numbers

U.S. October Jobless Rates Down over the Year in 280 of 372 Metro Areas; Payroll Jobs Up in 288

Jobless rates were lower in October than a year earlier in 280 of the 372 metropolitan areas, higher in 79, and unchanged in 13. Nonfarm payroll employment was up in 288 metropolitan areas over the year, down in 75, and unchanged in 9.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT -- OCTOBER 2013


Unemployment rates were lower in October than a year earlier in 280 of the 372
metropolitan areas, higher in 79 areas, and unchanged in 13 areas, the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Twenty-three areas had jobless rates
of at least 10.0 percent, and 57 areas had rates of less than 5.0 percent. Two
hundred eighty-eight metropolitan areas had over-the-year increases in nonfarm
payroll employment, 75 had decreases, and 9 had no change. The national
unemployment rate in October was 7.0 percent, not seasonally adjusted, down
from 7.5 percent a year earlier.

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Yuma, Ariz., and El Centro, Calif., had the highest unemployment rates in October,
31.9 percent and 25.2 percent, respectively. Bismarck, N.D., had the lowest rate,
1.7 percent. A total of 214 areas had October unemployment rates below the U.S.
figure of 7.0 percent, 144 areas had rates above it, and 14 areas had rates
equal to that of the nation. (See table 1.)

El Centro, Calif., had the largest over-the-year unemployment rate decrease in
October (-4.3 percentage points). Nine other areas had rate declines of at
least 2.0 percentage points, and an additional 95 areas had declines between
1.0 and 1.9 points. Yuma, Ariz., had the largest over-the-year jobless rate
increase (+2.3 percentage points). Thirteen other areas had unemployment rate
increases of 1.0 percentage point or more.

Of the 49 metropolitan areas with a Census 2000 population of 1 million or more,
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif., had the highest unemployment rate
in October, 9.8 percent. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis., had the
lowest rate among the large areas, 4.1 percent. Thirty-seven of the large areas
had over-the-year unemployment rate decreases, 10 had increases, and 2 had no
change. The largest rate decline occurred in Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario,
Calif. (-1.9 percentage points). Memphis, Tenn.-Miss.-Ark., had the largest
jobless rate increase over the year (+0.9 percentage point).

Metropolitan Division Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Eleven of the most populous metropolitan areas are made up of 34 metropolitan
divisions, which are essentially separately identifiable employment centers.
In October, Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, Mass.-N.H., had the highest jobless rate
among the divisions, 10.9 percent. San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City,
Calif., had the lowest unemployment rate, 5.1 percent. (See table 2.)

Twenty-four metropolitan divisions had over-the-year jobless rate decreases
in October, while 10 had increases. West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach,
Fla., had the largest rate decline from a year earlier (-1.7 percentage points),
followed by Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-Deerfield Beach, Fla. (-1.6 points).
Ten other divisions had rate decreases of 1.0 percentage point or more. Boston-
Cambridge-Quincy, Mass., and Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, D.C.-Va.-Md.-W.Va.,
had the largest unemployment rate increases over the year (+0.6 percentage point
each).

Metropolitan Area Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In October, 288 metropolitan areas had over-the-year increases in nonfarm
payroll employment, 75 had decreases, and 9 had no change. The largest over-
the-year employment increases occurred in New York-Northern New Jersey-Long
Island, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa. (+141,800), Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (+96,100),
and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif. (+84,700). The largest over-the-
year percentage gain in employment occurred in Naples-Marco Island, Fla. (+7.6
percent), followed by Sebastian-Vero Beach, Fla. (+6.7 percent), and Crestview-
Fort Walton Beach-Destin, Fla. (+6.0 percent). (See table 3.)

The largest over-the-year decrease in employment occurred in Cleveland-Elyria-
Mentor, Ohio (-7,700), followed by Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown, N.Y.
(-4,400), and Peoria, Ill. (-4,100). The largest over-the-year percentage
decreases in employment occurred in Decatur, Ill. (-4.3 percent), Manhattan,
Kan. (-3.5 percent), and Palm Coast, Fla. (-3.4 percent).

Over the year, nonfarm employment rose in 36 of the 37 metropolitan areas with
annual average employment levels above 750,000 in 2012. The largest over-the-
year percentage increase in employment in these large metropolitan areas
occurred in Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla. (+3.4 percent), followed by
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, N.C.-S.C. (+3.3 percent), and Dallas-Fort Worth-
Arlington, Texas (+3.1 percent). The only large area that had an over-the-year
percentage decrease in employment was Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio (-0.8
percent).

Metropolitan Division Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Nonfarm payroll employment data were available in October 2013 for 32 metropolitan
divisions, which are essentially separately identifiable employment centers
within a metropolitan area. Thirty of the 32 metropolitan divisions had over-
the-year employment gains and 2 had losses. The largest over-the-year increase
in employment among the metropolitan divisions occurred in New York-White
Plains-Wayne, N.Y.-N.J. (+90,300), followed by Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas
(+64,000), and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Calif. (+56,600). The only
over-the-year decreases in employment occurred in Gary, Ind. (-2,800), and
Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Mich. (-1,300). (See table 4.)

The largest over-the-year percentage increase in employment among the metropolitan
divisions occurred in Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (+3.5 percent), followed by
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas (+3.0 percent), and Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Mass.
(+2.7 percent). The only over-the-year percentage decreases in employment occurred
in Gary, Ind. (-1.0 percent), and Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Mich. (-0.2 percent).

_____________
The Regional and State Employment and Unemployment news release for November is
scheduled to be released on Friday, December 20, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. (EST). The
Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release for November is
scheduled to be released on Tuesday, January 7, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. (EST).



__________________________________________________________________
| |
| Partial Federal Government Shutdown |
| |
| Bureau of Labor Statistics data collection, analysis, and |
| dissemination activities were suspended from October 1, 2013, |
| through October 16, 2013, due to the partial shutdown of the |
| federal government. The Metropolitan Area Employment and |
| Unemployment news release for September 2013, which had been |
| scheduled for October 30, 2013, was cancelled due to the lack of |
| adequate processing time upon resumption of operations. With the |
| publication of this news release highlighting preliminary |
| metropolitan area data for October 2013, substate civilian labor |
| force and unemployment estimates for September 2013 are being |
| issued for the first time. Substate civilian labor force and |
| unemployment data for August 2013 also have been finalized with |
| the issuance of this release. Final nonfarm payroll employment |
| estimates for states and metropolitan areas in September 2013 |
| were issued with the October 2013 Regional and State Employment |
| and Unemployment news release on November 22, 2013, along with |
| final data for August 2013. |
| |
| The civilian labor force and unemployment data in this news |
| release are consistent with the concepts of the Current |
| Population Survey, while the nonfarm payroll employment data |
| come from the Current Employment Statistics survey of business |
| establishments. Information on the impact of the partial federal |
| government shutdown on these surveys is available at |
| www.bls.gov/bls/shutdown_2013_empsit_qa.pdf. |
|__________________________________________________________________|



_______________________________________________________________________
| |
| Retrospective Summary of September 2013 Metropolitan Area |
| Employment and Unemployment |
| |
| Unemployment rates were lower in September than a year earlier |
| in 268 of the 372 metropolitan areas, higher in 84 areas, and |
| unchanged in 20 areas. Two hundred and eighty-seven metropolitan |
| areas had over-the-year increases in nonfarm payroll employment, |
| 75 had decreases, and 10 had no change. |
| |
| Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted) -- |
| September |
| |
| Yuma, Ariz., and El Centro, Calif., had the highest unemployment |
| rates in September, 32.4 percent and 26.5 percent, respectively. |
| Bismarck, N.D., had the lowest rate, 1.8 percent. |
| |
| El Centro, Calif., had the largest over-the-year jobless rate |
| decrease (-3.6 percentage points), while Yuma, Ariz., had the |
| largest rate increase (+2.4 points). |
| |
| Metropolitan Area Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Not Seasonally |
| Adjusted) -- September |
| |
| The largest over-the-year employment increases occurred in New |
| York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, N.Y.-N.J.-Pa. (+134,500), |
| Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (+100,000), and Houston-Sugar |
| Land-Baytown, Texas (+85,500). The largest over-the-year |
| percentage gain in employment occurred in Sebastian-Vero Beach, |
| Fla. (+7.0 percent), followed by Naples-Marco Island, Fla. |
| (+5.4 percent), and Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Ark.-Mo. |
| (+5.3 percent). |
| |
| The largest over-the-year decrease in employment occurred in |
| Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio (-7,200), followed by Poughkeepsie-|
| Newburgh-Middletown, N.Y. (-3,300), and Birmingham-Hoover, Ala. |
| (-3,200). The largest over-the-year percentage decreases in |
| employment occurred in Decatur, Ill. (-4.7 percent), Manhattan, |
| Kan. (-3.1 percent), and Ocean City, N.J. (-3.0 percent). |
|_______________________________________________________________________|






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