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AmericInn Hotels Partners With Nationally Recognized Sleep Expert Dr. Christopher Drake

Announces Launch of 'Sleep Better America' Campaign

AmericInn AmericInn(R) International, LLC today announced a new strategic partnership with Dr. Christopher Drake, bioscientific investigator at Henry Ford Hospital Sleep Disorders and Research Center in Detroit. Dr. Drake will serve as the hotel chain's resident sleep expert for its new national consumer-focused sleep advocacy campaign called "Sleep Better America."

The mission of "Sleep Better America" is to educate consumers about issues that surround sleeplessness and how to combat sleeplessness when traveling in the United States. AmericInn will offer a variety of resources including sleep expert Dr. Drake, online content and information from accredited sleep associations. As the hotel chain's sleep spokesperson, Dr. Drake will offer regular articles and tips on how to achieve better sleep at home and while traveling. He'll also address sleep issues related to noise, stress, caffeine intake, weight and health concerns, all of which can impact normal sleep patterns.

"We're thrilled to work with Dr. Drake on this first-ever AmericInn sleep initiative," said Arnold Angeloni, CEO of AmericInn. "At AmericInn, our number one concern is the quality of sleep our guests receive under our roofs, so we're proud to offer quiet room environments along with the expertise of a nationally renowned sleep scientist."

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AmericInn, known as the "quiet hotel" chain due to a trademarked construction process called AmericInn SoundGuard(TM), has taken significant steps to build locations across the country that ensure guests enjoy a peaceful, relaxing stay without noise interruption from the room next door. For example, each AmericInn hotel is built with masonry block filled with sound-deadening foam, thick drywall and concrete slab floors to reduce noise between rooms. Carpeted floors, insulated corridor walls and guest room doors with thresholds and sweeps also help minimize noise.

To learn which noises consumers would despise hearing most during a hotel stay, AmericInn conducted a nationwide survey in July, and found the following noises are unacceptable in the room next door when trying to fall asleep on the road: intimate relations (25 percent), construction noises (23 percent), a heavy metal band (23 percent), followed by barking dogs and bathroom use.

The survey also revealed the high occurrence of sleep talking and snoring among Americans at night. Almost 60 percent of females polled said they have heard their husbands or partners talk in their sleep and 56 percent have been awoken by snoring partners.

"Light sleepers who often wake to a car passing outside or a partner's heavy breathing face a real battle in achieving adequate and consistent hours of sleep," said Dr. Drake. "Travel for light sleepers can be even worse since their sleep is so sound sensitive to all types of disruptions, so a hotel like AmericInn that has put money into building properties that mitigate noise, light and other interference, offers a solution to vacationers and business professionals who typically suffer sleepless nights because of environmental disturbances."

Christopher Drake, Ph.D., is a bioscientific investigator at the Henry Ford Hospital Sleep Disorders and Research Center and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the Wayne State University School of Medicine, both in Detroit.



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